Review: Click! The Ongoing Feminist Revolution for HASTAC

Recently I reviewed Click! The Ongoing Feminist Revolution for the Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory (HASTAC). It was my first opportunity to do a digital humanities exhibition review. Normally I’m tasked with doing traditional book reviews. I encourage anyone interested to check out HASTAC and offer to review a digital exhibition!

What is HASTAC?

According to their website, HASTAC is an “interdisciplinary community of humanists, artists, social scientists, scientists, and technologists that are changing the way we teach and learn.” They have over 13,000 members from over 400 different affiliations. Founded in 2002, HASTAC shares “news, tools, research, insights, pedagogy, methods, and projects–including Digital Humanities and other born-digital scholarship–and collaborate on various HASTAC initiatives.” HASTAC is a free and open access community. And they have a number of exciting current initiatives under way!

My Review

I’m unsure if I have the right to share the full review on my page. So I’m linking you directly to the review on HASTAC’s website. It can be found here. In the meantime, here’s the introduction in the hopes that it will lure you to the full review!

“Click! The Ongoing Feminist Revolution derives its clever name from two unique understandings of the word “click:” one being a 1970s term referring to the moment when a woman awakened to the powerful ideas of contemporary feminism, and the other referencing the click of a computer mouse connecting individuals to powerful ideas on the Internet. The objective of the site is to explore the power and complexity of gender consciousness in American life throughout history from the 1940s to present. In this capacity, the digital exhibition succeeds brilliantly and appears to be current with modern scholarship on the many subjects covered—no easy task.”

Click Review
Click! Front Page